Signs and the Wonder

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I awoke from a dream asking a question: Would we sin less if we could see God? I don’t know what the dream was about nor does it matter, but it got me thinking. The short answer to this is no. Having God imminently present among us, or revealed to us in some way, in itself, would do very little to change our hearts, no more than he being powerfully present among the children of Israel kept them from falling into sin or Jesus being among the Jews stopped them from rejecting him as Messiah. Remember, Lucifer fell in the very presence of God.

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A Portrait of Trust

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Kari Siren/Flickr

We are exhorted to trust God throughout Scripture. It is a biblical essential. A scriptural definition of trust in a single word is confidence, revealing that matters of trust toward God are inextricable of the term faith, a spiritual hallmark. My guess is that if you asked most Christians if they trust God or trust in him, they would say yes. But what does trusting God look like and how does one know they are confiding in him? That is my goal here, to envision it. Continue reading

Lectio Divina: Psalm 37:3

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The entire 37th chapter of Psalms is a marvelous encouragement. It was written by David to reassure the godly of God’s providence and care amidst the sinful and prosperous who seemed to flourish. The admonishment is that the righteous should not worry, grow unconfident, or lose their stability and, in temptation, flip sides when they see the ease with which the scoffer may live. Continue reading

Be Open to God

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JM Bertrand/CC-NC-ND

The best gifts I’ve received have been those that were unexpected or completely out of my control. What I mean by that explains a peeve of mine today where increasingly people feel an undue burden with pleasing others with what they give. We want people to like what we give them, but today we stress over how satisfied they will be if our gifts are not to their liking. Our charitableness must bow to lists of buying options or we give gift cards and money so there is no question that one got what he wished for. I’ve fallen into that trap, too. But that practice robs the giver of the joy that comes with presenting a particular item that has first filled their heart for the special one. Continue reading